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Oct 28

Five Tricks for Dealing With Halloween Treats


By Kathleen Doheny

WebMD Feature
Reviewed by Steve Drescher, DDS

Halloween Candy vs. Cavities: Don’t Make Kids Choose

Don't deny your children the Halloween experience. That can send the entirely wrong message -- deprivation -- and make candy seem even more irresistible, leading to other problems. They may end up sneaking sweets or eating too much candy once they're out on their own. Instead, let them have the joy of Halloween in all its sticky goodness and the experience of going to a party or trick-or-treating.

After your children get back from trick-or-treating or a party, go through their bags of Halloween candy together. Tell them to each pick the 10 or so (whatever number you decide, based on factors such as age) treats they want the most.

Get the unpicked treats out of sight. You can donate them to a food bank or freeze them if you can't bear to throw them out. This can also be a good time to teach (or remind) children that it isn't just excess sugar that can lead to cavities. Snacks such as pretzels, with starches that stay in the mouth longer, can also lead to cavities, as can fruit juices.

Letting children help decide what is a reasonable amount of candy to keep has benefits beyond good oral health. The message isn't "candy is bad," but that candy and other sweets, in excess, can lead to cavities.

Children learn two important lessons:

•How to control their diets

•That what they eat relates to oral health, not just physical health

Preventing Cavities in Children: Set a Treat Time

With your child, set a time of day to eat Halloween candy. This ritual “treat time” may last long after Halloween and help promote healthy thinking about treats:

•Children learn that eating sweets shouldn’t be an all-day feast. Moderation is key.

•Knowing they have a specific sweet time can help make children less inclined to think about eating sweets at other times of the day.

Children’s Oral Health: Set Up a Teeth Brushing Schedule
No matter when treat time is, it's crucial to brush soon after. If it is nighttime, for example, brushing and flossing teeth before bed will help sweep away the recent sweets. Fluoride mouth rinses for kids also help prevent tooth decay, according to the American Dental Association.
Until a child is 7 or 8 years old, a parent should help with teeth brushing, not simply supervise. Even after age 8, parents should supervise brushing. That includes friendly reminders to older children to brush and floss until they get to high school, when it should be a habit.

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/features/5-tricks-for-dealing-with-halloween-treats

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